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At a distance one third of the ARMSCYE above the point T, mark the point (point AC), draw in a horizontal line towards the left. Note that the measurement used for the Basic Bodice Block was the ARMSCYE DEPTH, defined as half the ARMSCYE measurement. Here we want a third of the full ARMSCYE measurement (which is two thirds of the ARMSCYE depth, if you prefer to think of it this way). This line is also double the distance between the point T and the point Y.

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    Mar 21, 2010, 10.43 PMby gedwoods

    Sorry I’m so late answering this – I’ve only just discovered there are comments for individual steps in the Techniques! To your first question, the manipulations are all done without seam allowance – in fact, slopers are sometimes defined as “patterns without seam allowance”. And yes, “armscye” is the technical term for the “round measurement” of the arm.

  • 1253ef6da08f9a1c901d80b9de58822a5056c690_large

    Nov 11, 2009, 11.19 PMby candyjoyce

    Hi gedwoods,

    This looks like a great tutorial, i’ve only read through it and not actualy followed it yet. I wonder if you have time to answer a question for me? I am planning to draft a sleeve pattern using your tutorial for a sleevess dress pattern that I already have. This is probably a bit dumb but I assume all of the above tutorial is to be carried out on the bodice pattern WITHOUT seam allowance?

    Also, just out of interest how come you call the arm-hole pattern ‘ARMSCYE’ is this a technical term?

    Thanks for your time and for all your effort in putting this useful how-to together.

    Cheers Candy

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Burdastyle

http://burdastyle.com//techniques/drafting-sleeve-for-basic-bodice-block/technique_steps/3