The inspiration for this is our very own projects section. Since we are world wide, members have names for their articles of clothing according to where they live and post their projects with those names. Not a problem, but I thought it would be neat to hear where the names fit in to the list below starting with skirts and moving through necklines, sleeve types and various items,. I’m sure there are still a multitude of types so please add any that I have overlooked and let me know what you call your skirts. (Even pet names!)

1. A-line skirt. So called because it looks like the letter “A”. Narrow at the top, and a bit wider at the bottom. A wardrobe essential. Very possibly the most often worn skirt.

2. Gypsy or tiered skirt: A skirt made with several horizontal layers of fabric that are gathered together. A mainstay of bohemian dressing aka. boho.

3. Mermaid Skirt: Typically fitted from waist to knees, then flaring out from knees down like a mermaid’s tail.

4. Mini Skirt: Hemline above the knee.

5. Micro Mini Skirt: Basically as short as you can go without the skirt qualifying as a belt.

6. Bustle Skirt: Generally flat across the stomach, with ruffles in the back. It’s making a comeback now as part of Steampunk/Neovictorian fashion.

7. Pencil skirt: Popular in movies from the 1940’s, a very slender silouette that hugs the body and is often worn just beneath the knees or down to mid-calf.

8. Maxi skirt: A skirt that goes from waist to ankles.

9. Grommeted skirts or skirts with gussets: A skirt made of vertical panels that go from waist to hemline. Great skirts for dancing as you can get a lot of fabric is a slimming silouette.

10. Pleated skirt: The girl’s version of a kilt. Pleats are folds of fabric that are sewn across the top similar to gathers. Pleated garments require a lot more fabric.

11. Sarong or pareau: A type of wrap skirt that usually fastens on one side or ties at the hip.

12. Wrap skirt: A skirt without a side seam that is worn wrapped around and tied on the side.

13: Puddle skirt: A long skirt with fabric that puddles on the ground when you stand still.

14. Circle skirt: Cut a circle, cut a hole in the center for the waist. Add a slit at the waist to accomodate a zipper or ties.

15. Jeans skirt: A skirt made by slitting an old pair of jeans and reforming them into a skirt. Or a skirt made out of denim.

16: Bubble skirt: A skirt with a tight waist, full body, then tight again at the hem line causing it to poof out like a bubble.

17. Tutu: A specialized skirt usually made of tulle originally used in ballet, but has now snuck into goth and fetish wear.

18: Flared skirt: Start with an A-line skirt but make the bottom wider.

20. High waisted skirt: A skirt that goes higher than the waistline by a little or a lot. Pencil skirts in particular are often high-waisted.

21. Combo skirts: Many skirts, especially repurposed or upcycled skirts combine more than one style together, like part jeans, part ruffles.

22. Gathered skirt: Perhaps the simplest of all skirts. The waist is gathered into the waistband.

23. Broomstick skirt: Typically a long skirt with vertical wrinkles. These skirts were once wrapped around a broom handle while wet and when dry they had wrinkles. Other methods are rolling the skirt and pulling it through the leg of a discarded stocking (nylons) or drying it in the dryer till damp, rolling it up, knotting it in the middle and letting it dry that way until wearing.

The names and descriptions of the skirts above have been gathered from various sources on the www.

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4 Posts Sign in to add a post

  • Img_0333_large

    Jan 19, 2011, 05.30 AMby sew4my3

    I will start with a pet name I have for a " tiered skirt", grey and black that I own. It’s called my witchy poo skirt! LOL

    Love to hear yours and why!

  • Missing

    Feb 27, 2011, 08.27 PMby kaymay59

    All my skirts are A line to just on the knee. Boring I know, but I think it’s the most flattering style and the easiest to make (for me anyway)!

    1 Reply
    • Img_0333_large

      Mar 3, 2011, 02.07 AMby sew4my3

      If it works then you have many options with fabrics and little details to make it your own personal style. I find it hard to believe that as a sewer that any of your clothing would be boring! Happy sewing!

  • 121bcd6a71a_avatar_large

    Feb 28, 2011, 12.47 AMby harrietbazley

    I think your ‘mermaid skirt’ is what we call a ‘fishtail’ skirt, and your ‘bubble skirt’ a ‘tulip’ skirt (in both cases the reasons are obvious!)

    I normally wear A-line, pleated or tiered skirts as I’ve got a small waist and over-developed thighs (too much cycling!)

    1 Reply
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      Mar 3, 2011, 02.06 AMby sew4my3

      How funny that words can be so a little different to explain the same thing.

      I too have muscle thighs, but from gymnastics and prefer A-line and looser styles in that area.

  • Manneqin_large

    Mar 2, 2011, 11.37 PMby japconst

    the original “sarung” (Malaysian word) is more a sheath (made from batik material – like a tubular piece of fabric) worn by both men and women. Men wear them at the waist (step inside the tubular fabric, then fold the excess against your front and tuck the top into your waistline) and then shorten them to facilitate movement by picking up the ends and tying them at the waistline. Women wear the sarungs at chest level to cover their breasts and normally that will be their “dress” for working around the house. Sometimes, she wears the sarung at the waist with a “baju” as blouse. The baju is usually embroidered all the way from neckline down the front of the blouse.

    1 Reply
    • Img_0333_large

      Mar 3, 2011, 02.02 AMby sew4my3

      Oh that’s really neat! Thanks for adding this information!

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