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I had a love\hate relationship with the super stiff (yet remarkably flexible) interfacing known as Timtex. While I despised working with this stabilizer (it was a tad bit harder to sew and required extra trimming around edges for sharp corners), I knew it was essential to making professional looking bags, hats, and even fabric boxes. Now ,I find out that the company that produced Timtex is no longer able to manufacture the product due to a sudden shutdown of their facility sometime late last year (I’ve read that they are attempting to find someone else to produce their stabilizer, but until then what you are able to find in stores and on the internet is that last remains of their product). What’s a girl to do now? This article has some great options that might just help you find a replacement the next time your project calls for Timtex.

2 Comments

  • C94b10e754a19be626dd3ae051241a7e18f9a7d8_large

    Mar 31, 2008, 01.42 PMby jj1

    I means to sub for bag bottom.

  • C94b10e754a19be626dd3ae051241a7e18f9a7d8_large

    Mar 31, 2008, 01.40 PMby jj1

    Plastic canvas that used in crosstitching is good sub. for Timtex. I don’t like Timtex that much, I don’t know if I’m going miss it.

    • This is a question
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