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Tell us your best tip for maintaining your sewing machine for your chance to win an Amy Butler prize pack!

In our spring issue of BurdaStyle US magazine, Rowan is giving away a Rowan Hapi by Amy Butler prize pack including fabric, patterns, and a book worth over $500.

For a chance to win this package, answer the following question in the comments section below: WHAT’S YOUR BEST TIP FOR MAINTAINING YOUR SEWING MACHINE?

Be sure to include your first name, last initial, city, and country (or state if you live in the US). The deadline for submissions is Friday, March 14, 2014, at 11:59 PM (EST). One lucky winner will be chosen and announced in the summer issue of BurdaStyle US magazine!

Good luck!

110 Comments

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    Feb 16, 2014, 05.56 AMby inspirehope

    Keep a cover on the machine.

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    Feb 16, 2014, 03.30 AMby mad14kt

    Keeping it DUST free :)

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    Feb 16, 2014, 03.30 AMby mad14kt

    Keeping it DUST free :)

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    Feb 16, 2014, 02.38 AMby Darwinia

    I feel like the puppy who has been reprimanded. I admit, I have never cleaned my machine in the 15 years I have owned it! But my sewing projects are sporadic. I am a changed woman! Dusting and oiling are in short order.

    Meredith L., Issaquah, WA, USA

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    Feb 16, 2014, 02.35 AMby jenss-1

    Make a habit of doing a quick brush-out of the bobbin compartment before starting a new project.

    I tend to forget to clean out the bobbin compartment when finishing a project, but I make a point of doing this mini-cleaning when I’m getting organized to sew something new. When I sit down in front of the machine, my first step is to check the needle and then the second step is to clean out the old lint and any stray threads (step 3 is bobbin winding & threading). Simple, but it prevents mid-project thread tangles and other annoyances–and that’s always a good thing! ~Jen

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    Feb 16, 2014, 01.50 AMby Susan Bonilla

    Every Monday is Cleaning Day. I use my machine a lot so every Monday I open her up and take out the bobbin holder and clean her. Then I remove a larger easy pieces of lint. Then I use a soft brush, usually an old paintbrush, to wipe out everything I can reach. I was told a long time ago not to use compressed air or blow into your machine, it pushes lint into places you cannot reach and that can cause problems down the line. I then replace my needle, so I always have a fresh needle. I also do bobbin winding on Monday so I am set for a fresh week of sewing!

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    Feb 16, 2014, 01.23 AMby LNW22

    Clean out all lint. Use canned air, lint brushes. Open the bottom cover and any access panels. Lint will eventually harden and freeze up moving parts, becoming a costly mess!

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    Feb 16, 2014, 12.15 AMby jmelsha

    Take all the access panels off when you vacuum out lint, change the needle regularly, and use the right tools when sewing thick fabrics. I have a “hump jumper” that keeps me from breaking needles and damaging my machine- best $3 I ever spent. Joel Melsha, Orlando, FL

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    Feb 15, 2014, 11.28 PMby surfjewels

    Keep it covered, clean out the lint and check the bobbin tension so that all runs smoothly.

    Hannah I, Southend, England

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    Feb 15, 2014, 11.16 PMby soulsister

    Use the right size bobbin! Your tension will be screwy if you don’t! And use canned air to clean out the dust from all the crevices before you begin working. Geneva W., Los Angeles, CA, USA.

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    Feb 15, 2014, 10.09 PMby animegirlie

    Using the best quality thread is the easiest way to keep gunk out of your machine! Also having a surge protector on the machine (especially for computerized units like the one I have) does wonders for keeping it alive longer.

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    Feb 15, 2014, 09.11 PMby pksews

    Use a surge protector to protect the electronics from electrical storms, and make it a lovely cover that makes you smile at it whenever you see it. If you sew with small children, get them their own machine (real, but cheap) and convince them that theirs is far more fun than yours. Pam S Ettrick, WI

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    Feb 15, 2014, 07.40 PMby thaack

    Just remember that sewing machines have feelings and emotions too. Liza, my machine likes only Gutterman thread and Shmetz needles. Treat her right and she will treat you well.

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    Feb 15, 2014, 06.27 PMby goonybird

    Clean the machine often and use good thread

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    Feb 15, 2014, 06.19 PMby ishoward

    Treat your sewing machine nicely and never ever say mean things about her. – Ivory H. (Washington, DC)

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    Feb 15, 2014, 06.00 PMby Grandcarr

    Keep it clean! Clean after each project or more often if the fabric is high in lint. Dust and cover it when done. Have it serviced once a year. Change needles often – usually after each project. I never allow anyone else to use my primary sewing, serging or embroidery machines. I have 2 machines that I use to teach and attend classes – but even those are not loaned out. We need to protect our investments!

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    Feb 15, 2014, 05.39 PMby melody1234

    Keep it clean and oiled! Sandra K. Toronto, Canada

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    Feb 15, 2014, 05.06 PMby iwannasew2

    Keep it covered at all times when not in use, and use an air duster (the kind most use for keyboards) to blow dust out of bobbin area (I have an old machine). Thanks.

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    Feb 15, 2014, 04.21 PMby janehiatt

    I try never to curse directly at my 1960’s Bernina, I know it hurts her feelings. Also NO ONE is allow to TOUCH her but ME, we are totally exclusive that way. I keep her busy and clean, and her manual close at hand. I will make good on getting you that new belt someday soon, Baby, I promise. I love you, Girl!

  • Missing

    Feb 15, 2014, 04.21 PMby Melissa Haren

    Cover, dust, and get into the nooks and crannies with that little brush that came with it. My machine is newer and there is no where for me to oil it myself. Also, I take it every other year for a professional cleaning and tune up. Newer machines are so meticulously calibrated that we may not notice a small miss, but it really can hurt the machine to continue sewing with it like that indefinitely. Besides, who doesn’t appreciate a day at the spa? My machine is like my best friend and she should get a spa day, too!!!

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    Feb 15, 2014, 03.54 PMby qsogirl

    change your needle frequently. I need to listen to my own advice!

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    Feb 15, 2014, 03.11 PMby Carol Ann Taylor

    Vacuum, vacuum and vacuum. Clean and preventative maintenance is the key!

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    Feb 15, 2014, 02.11 PMby HannahClark

    No Dust!!! Prevention and removal are my machine’s best friends (my machine doesn’t take oiling).

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    Feb 15, 2014, 02.08 PMby Clarisa Skinner

    Oil moving parts regularly, wipe down machine after use and keep covered when not in use.

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    Feb 15, 2014, 01.06 PMby ArcticFoxx

    My Sewing machine is a 1960s Singer! I vacuum and dust the bobbin assembly regularly, use a folded piece of scrap fabric to clean dust from the tension discs, and cover it to keep it dust and pet hair free!

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    Feb 15, 2014, 12.31 PMby qml347

    cover your machine when not using.

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    Feb 15, 2014, 10.56 AMby jozinn

    Keep it clean, read instruction manual again and again. Jody Z. RI

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    Feb 15, 2014, 10.00 AMby racadoo

    Rachel S, Derby , England.

    When in doubt; read the manual. Never lend (I learned that the hard way).

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    Feb 15, 2014, 08.52 AMby MadeByDi

    A happy sewing machine is one that never sits idle too long, allowing dust to gather on well lubricated parts. so my best sewing machine maintenance tip… Sew a Burda design every day!

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    Feb 15, 2014, 08.38 AMby Claire Cooper

    I keep the presser foot down when not using my machine, as it’s an old one it helps avoid the tension discs decoding loose. C.Cooper Newbiggin, uk

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