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This past weekend my friend Julia came to visit me from Boston. There’s nothing like good old pals. On Saturday we went to the High Line in Chelsea, to take in the view and walk in the sun, and, after trying on every single perfume in the Comme des Garcons shop we drifted to the MoMa where we saw the stunning Bauhaus exhibition.

I am already familiar with the constructivist-style collages and paintings of my favorite artist, László Moholy-Nagy, and it was a thrill to see many of his pieces up close, but what blew my mind was the textile work of Anni Albers. Utilizing a mechanical Jacquard loom invented by Joseph Marie Jacquard in 1801, Albers created mathematically inspired rugs and drapery that, to me, would make the most astounding textiles even today. The Jacquard loom uses a punch card system which was an important conceptual precursor to the development of computer programming. One is able to create extremely complex designs, seeing that these looms often have thousands of threads and can take days to re-thread. Hanging next to the draperies were numerous renderings in gouache depicting design patterns for the loom. The complexity and harmony so moving.

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